China in comparative perspective working paper series

 

In order to meet different needs Bijiao: China in Comparative Perspective  working paper series (ISSN 2043-0434) was founded at LSE. It considered submitted papers, seminar presentations and conference papers. The working paper series will be discontinued from 2013, these papers and many other papers are under review and revision and which might be published in the future JCCP.

Editorial team:

Editors: Professor Stephan Feuchtwang and Dr Kent Deng

Managing Editor: Dr Xiangqun Chang

We would never forget Professor Stephan Feuchtwang, the former Editor-in-chief of all the CCPN publications including the working paper series Bijiao: China in Comparative Perspective (ISSN 2043-0434) for his dedication and valued advice for laying foundation of CCPN publications and commitment of helping book review of JCCP in the future. Our thanks also go to Dr Kent Deng, the former Editor of the CCPN publications, for his effort and support.

Bijiao: China in Comparative Perspective (ISSN 2043-0434) working paper series considers submitted papers, seminar presentations and conference papers. The following themes were proposed at that time:

  1. Bijiao: China in Comparative Perspective  
  2. Bijiao: Network and Relationship Research
  3. Bijiao: China and International Relationships Research   
  4. Bijiao: Studies on Chinese and other civilizations
  5. Bijiao: China and Global Economic History Studies
  6. Bijiao: Migrants and Immigrants in Global Society
  7. Bijiao: Muslim Minorities in China and Europe
  8. Bijiao: Chinese Management Studies and Beyond
  9. Bijiao: Chinese Governance Studies and Beyond
  10. Bijiao: Chinese Policy Studies and Beyond 

Presentation: all submissions should be made electronically in Word format. They should be double-spaced throughout (including notes and list of references). Notes should be endnotes. Do not justify right-hand margins.

References: list all references alphabetically. References cited in the text should use the form (Jones 2004: 89). The list of references in full at the end should use the following convention:

Articles in journals: Jones, Peter (2004) 'Mass retailing strategies in China and the USA by global corporations' Consumer I (3): 511-535

Chapters in books: Jones, James (2001) 'Slimming and asceticism' in Greta Moore (ed) The Anti-Greed Movement: its origins and extent. London: Broadbooks pp. 235-272

Books: Jonathan Szyps (1998) Merriment Under Socialism. Canberra, Australia: Olive Press

Affiliation: the title page of the review should include the full name(s) of the author(s), academic or other personal affiliation and electronic address of the author(s) to which correspondence should be sent. For the end of the review, please include a sentence or two about yourself.

Permissions: authors are responsible for obtaining permissions from copyright holders for reproducing any illustrations, figures, tables or lengthy quotations previously published.

Tables and figures: tables should be typed on separate sheets and their position indicated by a note in the text. Line diagrams should be in a format suitable for immediate reproduction without any need for redrawing. Illustrations should be high resolution. Photographs should be black and white with a good range of contrast. All tables, figures and illustrations should be accompanied by a brief caption.

Word limit: see details below: Research articles: up to 8,000 words or less (including notes and list of references)

Abstract and Keywords: every submission should include an abstract of no more than 150 words, and a list of key words (no more than 8)

Author’s details: submission should include author’s names, institution, address and email address

Copy-editing: we are not able to provide copy-editing services, please ensure that the review sent to us is in a publishable state.

Cover design: Jonathan Ing, Design Unit, London School of Economics

© CCPN Global

ISSN: 2043-0434

Contact details: books@ccpn-global.org

Abstracts of working papers

Working paper No.1, 2012:

A Comparative Study of Modern Chinese Political History, 1926 – 1992: Examining the Nationalist, Maoist, and Dengist Forms of State-Society Relations

Kuang-Hao Hou

Abstract:    This paper examines three forms of state-society relations in modern Chinese political history between 1926 and 1992 by employing two methods of comparative historical research: the individualizing comparison and variation-finding comparison. Through these methods, this paper argues that modern Chinese politics, and other Chinese social phenomena, rather than being an exceptional, exotic case, can be beneficial to social scientists in its use for comparative studies. China, as a case for social research, can test and generate social theories about all human social actions. In order to sustain the above main argument, the individualizing comparison in this paper identifies the outline and structure of three distinct forms (the Nationalist crisis-driven form for pacification, the Maoist utopia-driven form for mobilization, and the Dengist form for rapid growth through marketization) of Chinese state-society relations, and the variation-finding comparison points out the common structural factors (military threats and ideological institutions) that influence both the European and Chinese experiences of modern state formation. This commonality between Chinese and European history, therefore, is an important clue for scholars to undertake research without excluding the possibility of utilizing China as a useful case for comparative studies.

Click HERE to download

 

Working paer No.2, 2011:

Chinese and Russian immigration to the united kingdom in a comparative perspective

Esuna Dugarova

Abstract: This article provides a comparative analysis of Chinese and Russian migration flows to the UK with special reference to skilled migration. Based on the examination of economic, political and cultural attributes of China and Russia, it identifies similarities and differences between the two countries and defines the nature of Chinese and Russian migrants’ movements and the characteristics of their communities in the UK. Findings of an empirical study involving interviews with Chinese and Russian migrants as well as implications of UK immigration policy are discussed.

Click HERE to download

 

Working paper No.1, 2011:

Are Climate Policies in China and India Responsive to Demographic Changes?

Amitendu Palit

Abstract: Demographic evolution and resultant changes in energy consumption patterns have significant implications for carbon emissions in China and India. The paper reviews the evidence on the inter-relationship between demographic changes, energy use and emissions for the two countries and finds urbanisation and changes in household energy consumptions to have significant effect on emissions. But national climate polices in China and India do not appear to have taken explicit note of the inter-relationship and effects. Pointing out that climate policies in both countries are still evolving, the paper argues for greater policy emphasis on residential and household consumption patterns as opposed to the present focus on energy use by industry. It further argues that de-linking energy-intensity from carbon-intensity is likely to be difficult for both countries as cheaper prices of carbon-intensive fuels like coal can discourage households, particularly low-income urban families, from substituting them by more expensive cleaner fuels.

Click HERE to download

Click HERE to Chinese page

 

中国比较研究工作论文系列

 

In order to meet different needs Bijiao: China in Comparative Perspective  working paper series (ISSN 2043-0434) was founded at LSE. It considered submitted papers, seminar presentations and conference papers. The working paper series will be discontinued from 2013, these papers and many other papers are under review and revision and which might be published in the future JCCP.

编辑小组:

编辑: 王斯福教授及邓钢博士
执行编辑: 常向群博士

We would never forget Professor Stephan Feuchtwang, the former Editor-in-chief of all the CCPN publications including the working paper series Bijiao: China in Comparative Perspective (ISSN 2043-0434) for his dedication and valued advice for laying foundation of CCPN publications and commitment of helping book review of JCCP in the future. Our thanks also go to Dr Kent Deng, the former Editor of the CCPN publications, for his effort and support.

Bijiao: China in Comparative Perspective (ISSN 2043-0434) working paper series considers submitted papers, seminar presentations and conference papers. The following themes were proposed at that time:

  1. Bijiao: China in Comparative Perspective  
  2. Bijiao: Network and Relationship Research
  3. Bijiao: China and International Relationships Research   
  4. Bijiao: Studies on Chinese and other civilizations
  5. Bijiao: China and Global Economic History Studies
  6. Bijiao: Migrants and Immigrants in Global Society
  7. Bijiao: Muslim Minorities in China and Europe
  8. Bijiao: Chinese Management Studies and Beyond
  9. Bijiao: Chinese Governance Studies and Beyond
  10. Bijiao: Chinese Policy Studies and Beyond 

投稿: all submissions should be made electronically in Word format. They should be double-spaced throughout (including notes and list of references). Notes should be endnotes. Do not justify right-hand margins.

参考: list all references alphabetically. References cited in the text should use the form (Jones 2004: 89). The list of references in full at the end should use the following convention:

Articles in journals: Jones, Peter (2004) 'Mass retailing strategies in China and the USA by global corporations' Consumer I (3): 511-535

Chapters in books: Jones, James (2001) 'Slimming and asceticism' in Greta Moore (ed) The Anti-Greed Movement: its origins and extent. London: Broadbooks pp. 235-272

Books: Jonathan Szyps (1998) Merriment Under Socialism. Canberra, Australia: Olive Press

所属机构: the title page of the review should include the full name(s) of the author(s), academic or other personal affiliation and electronic address of the author(s) to which correspondence should be sent. For the end of the review, please include a sentence or two about yourself.

批准: authors are responsible for obtaining permissions from copyright holders for reproducing any illustrations, figures, tables or lengthy quotations previously published.

表及数字: tables should be typed on separate sheets and their position indicated by a note in the text. Line diagrams should be in a format suitable for immediate reproduction without any need for redrawing. Illustrations should be high resolution. Photographs should be black and white with a good range of contrast. All tables, figures and illustrations should be accompanied by a brief caption.

字数限制: see details below: Research articles: up to 8,000 words or less (including notes and list of references)

提要及关键字: every submission should include an abstract of no more than 150 words, and a list of key words (no more than 8)

作者介绍: submission should include author’s names, institution, address and email address

Copy 编辑: we are not able to provide copy-editing services, please ensure that the review sent to us is in a publishable state.

封面设计: Jonathan Ing, Design Unit, London School of Economics

© CCPN Global

ISSN: 2043-0434

联系方法:  books@ccpn-global.org

工作论文提要

工作论文 No.1, 2012:

A Comparative Study of Modern Chinese Political History, 1926 – 1992: Examining the Nationalist, Maoist, and Dengist Forms of State-Society Relations

Kuang-Hao Hou

提要:    This paper examines three forms of state-society relations in modern Chinese political history between 1926 and 1992 by employing two methods of comparative historical research: the individualizing comparison and variation-finding comparison. Through these methods, this paper argues that modern Chinese politics, and other Chinese social phenomena, rather than being an exceptional, exotic case, can be beneficial to social scientists in its use for comparative studies. China, as a case for social research, can test and generate social theories about all human social actions. In order to sustain the above main argument, the individualizing comparison in this paper identifies the outline and structure of three distinct forms (the Nationalist crisis-driven form for pacification, the Maoist utopia-driven form for mobilization, and the Dengist form for rapid growth through marketization) of Chinese state-society relations, and the variation-finding comparison points out the common structural factors (military threats and ideological institutions) that influence both the European and Chinese experiences of modern state formation. This commonality between Chinese and European history, therefore, is an important clue for scholars to undertake research without excluding the possibility of utilizing China as a useful case for comparative studies.

Click HERE to download

 

工作论文 No.2, 2011:

Chinese and Russian immigration to the united kingdom in a comparative perspective

Esuna Dugarova

提要: This article provides a comparative analysis of Chinese and Russian migration flows to the UK with special reference to skilled migration. Based on the examination of economic, political and cultural attributes of China and Russia, it identifies similarities and differences between the two countries and defines the nature of Chinese and Russian migrants’ movements and the characteristics of their communities in the UK. Findings of an empirical study involving interviews with Chinese and Russian migrants as well as implications of UK immigration policy are discussed.

Click HERE to download

 

工作论文 No.1, 2011:

Are Climate Policies in China and India Responsive to Demographic Changes?

Amitendu Palit

提要: Demographic evolution and resultant changes in energy consumption patterns have significant implications for carbon emissions in China and India. The paper reviews the evidence on the inter-relationship between demographic changes, energy use and emissions for the two countries and finds urbanisation and changes in household energy consumptions to have significant effect on emissions. But national climate polices in China and India do not appear to have taken explicit note of the inter-relationship and effects. Pointing out that climate policies in both countries are still evolving, the paper argues for greater policy emphasis on residential and household consumption patterns as opposed to the present focus on energy use by industry. It further argues that de-linking energy-intensity from carbon-intensity is likely to be difficult for both countries as cheaper prices of carbon-intensive fuels like coal can discourage households, particularly low-income urban families, from substituting them by more expensive cleaner fuels.

Click HERE to download
 

 

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